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Dec 7

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KING KONG DIED FOR YOUR SINS

Something like this.

Way more King Kong without actually featuring King Kong than this particular ape. Which is a great painting btw. It just needed more King Kong. And fatter in-your-face lettering. Because he DIED, man. For your SINS.
Oct 2

KING KONG DIED FOR YOUR SINS

Something like this.

Way more King Kong without actually featuring King Kong than this particular ape. Which is a great painting btw. It just needed more King Kong. And fatter in-your-face lettering. Because he DIED, man. For your SINS.

Botter Beach Party

Finished poster + yearbook page

I like the way I positioned the palm trees in the B/W version a little bit better, it looks more “natural” if they sprout from one point and grow apart, rather than the other way around—that makes sense, I guess, a tree wouldn’t grow towards another tree, cause they’re competing for sunlight.

Also I think I got the glowing brightness of the setting acorn-sun better in the second version, I suppose the orange sky in the colour version is just a tad too bright to add a convincing setting sun (which, being the only source of light, should of course be the brightest object).

Problem is, what you’re looking for is an extremely bright red for the top of the acorn-sun. Easy to do if you’re an actual sunset, the pure red of a (filtered) setting sun is still really bright (you can feel it on your face—although technically that’s infra-red) and your eyes are accustomed to the twilight. Unfortunately, the backlight of your monitor is not quite adequate to represent the intense colour spectrum of an actual celestial body’s nuclear fusion filtered through a few hundreds of kilometres atmosphere. It’s even more problematic in print because whatever light source is illumating the paper, is going to be brighter than that very thing you want to be the brightest of everything!

So, compromises have to be made.

Either you sort of fudge it, like I did in the colour version, aiming that people will associate the reds and oranges with a sunset even if the brightness is incorrect. This works reasonably well, IMO—especially if you consider the previous post with the dark acorn silhouette: it doesn’t make any sense but you still know it represents a sunset!

The other option is to darken everything until the acorn-sun is actually the brightest object in the image. This is easier to do if you’re working with just one shade, so I did it for the greyscale version. In hindsight I might have even made it brighter than the foreground lettering, but I was short on time. Next time I will export something like this as three bitmap layers and adjust the colour curves in GIMP (slightly easier for that sort of thing).
Sep 17

Botter Beach Party

Finished poster + yearbook page

I like the way I positioned the palm trees in the B/W version a little bit better, it looks more “natural” if they sprout from one point and grow apart, rather than the other way around—that makes sense, I guess, a tree wouldn’t grow towards another tree, cause they’re competing for sunlight.

Also I think I got the glowing brightness of the setting acorn-sun better in the second version, I suppose the orange sky in the colour version is just a tad too bright to add a convincing setting sun (which, being the only source of light, should of course be the brightest object).

Problem is, what you’re looking for is an extremely bright red for the top of the acorn-sun. Easy to do if you’re an actual sunset, the pure red of a (filtered) setting sun is still really bright (you can feel it on your face—although technically that’s infra-red) and your eyes are accustomed to the twilight. Unfortunately, the backlight of your monitor is not quite adequate to represent the intense colour spectrum of an actual celestial body’s nuclear fusion filtered through a few hundreds of kilometres atmosphere. It’s even more problematic in print because whatever light source is illumating the paper, is going to be brighter than that very thing you want to be the brightest of everything!

So, compromises have to be made.

Either you sort of fudge it, like I did in the colour version, aiming that people will associate the reds and oranges with a sunset even if the brightness is incorrect. This works reasonably well, IMO—especially if you consider the previous post with the dark acorn silhouette: it doesn’t make any sense but you still know it represents a sunset!

The other option is to darken everything until the acorn-sun is actually the brightest object in the image. This is easier to do if you’re working with just one shade, so I did it for the greyscale version. In hindsight I might have even made it brighter than the foreground lettering, but I was short on time. Next time I will export something like this as three bitmap layers and adjust the colour curves in GIMP (slightly easier for that sort of thing).

Botter Beach Party

Work in progress.

I should point out that I used this tutorial as a guide for creating this scene. I can really recommend the entire series if you want to get started with InkScape. It’s called 2D Game Art for Programmers, it’s quite good whether you’re a coder or not. The important lesson (for me, at least) was learning a certain kind of workflow that hadn’t really occurred to me figuring out InkScape by myself, a lot of things clicked and it became a lot of fun to do!

One particular thing I like about InkScape (or vector design in general, I guess) is that to create good-looking bitmap images you really need a drawing tablet + stylus, or really good (photo) source material. On the other hand, in InkScape I can do everything with mouse and keyboard and I feel just as expressive. Having a drawing tablet is always nice, but for InkScape the only thing I can imagine it’d be more useful for than a mouse would be freehand lettering. Which is cool, and I would probably use it if I could (I should really order a drawing tablet, soon).
Sep 5

Botter Beach Party

Work in progress.

I should point out that I used this tutorial as a guide for creating this scene. I can really recommend the entire series if you want to get started with InkScape. It’s called 2D Game Art for Programmers, it’s quite good whether you’re a coder or not. The important lesson (for me, at least) was learning a certain kind of workflow that hadn’t really occurred to me figuring out InkScape by myself, a lot of things clicked and it became a lot of fun to do!

One particular thing I like about InkScape (or vector design in general, I guess) is that to create good-looking bitmap images you really need a drawing tablet + stylus, or really good (photo) source material. On the other hand, in InkScape I can do everything with mouse and keyboard and I feel just as expressive. Having a drawing tablet is always nice, but for InkScape the only thing I can imagine it’d be more useful for than a mouse would be freehand lettering. Which is cool, and I would probably use it if I could (I should really order a drawing tablet, soon).

Squid Monster

Having fun with InkScape
Jul 22

Squid Monster

Having fun with InkScape

Ghettoblast from the Past

Promo poster for an 80(8)ies bar-night.
Jun 25

Ghettoblast from the Past

Promo poster for an 80(8)ies bar-night.

Vocoder

People sometimes ask me what is the secret to great music, so I decided to put it in a schematic drawing for them.
Apr 4

Vocoder

People sometimes ask me what is the secret to great music, so I decided to put it in a schematic drawing for them.